Treating a black eye

Bolton Wanderers physio Andy Mitchell on how to handle a tasty shiner
Treating a black eye

OUCH, HOW DID YOU GET THAT?

Black eyes are normally caused by a clash of heads or a boot to the face. Usually, these are minor and the player can continue; however, in rare cases more serious damage has occurred, which needs expert medical attention at a hospital.

HOW TO TREAT IT

A blow to the head will cause a blood vessel to burst, or on some occasions the skin will actually be broken, causing an open wound. If the skin is broken, the wound must be cleaned and direct pressure applied to the wound with a gauze pad to prevent excessive bleeding. Once this is controlled, check that all eye movements are normal and there is no blood inside the eyeball. Examine the bones for possible fractures and changes to the sensations of the skin in and around the eye and the face, to avoid missing an underlying eye socket fracture.
 

DON’T WORRY, IT’S NOT GOING TO KILL YOU...

The majority of these injuries heal within seven to 10 days like a normal bruise or cut, and in that case all you have to be wary of is ribbing from your team-mates. However, this is a very sensitive and delicate area, and it is not recommended to take any chances. If it is clear the player has received a sizeable blow to the head they should be taken off for the necessary medical attention.
Andy Mitchell Injuries

Andy Mitchell

Wigan Athletic's, head physiotherapist

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